HO’OMAU KE OLA - Their efforts to heal and strengthen communityNestled in the valley of Wai’anae Kai moku, a place today com- monly referred to as Ka’ala, is 1,100 acres of land waiting to be  revitalized–to become the refuge and nutriment source of life energy that it once was. Dr. Patti Isaacs, Executive Director of Ho’omau Ke Ola and Glen Kila, former Principal of Kamaile Academy blessed me with their mana’o and mo’olelo about a piece of land that is much more than dirt, rock, and trees–this place they endearingly refer  to as Pūnana’ula.

Uncle Glen shared mo’olelo passed down through generations of Kupuka’aina ‘ohana, rich in the Hawaiian view that edifies the  connection and interdependence of man and nature. Kupuka’aina refers to the name of Wai’anae ‘ohana who trace their lineage to the original inhabitants of Wai’anae. According to Uncle Glen, family mo’olelo are not stories from a book or words of a researcher. he mo’olelo are  records of history.  he land in which we stood was historically called Pūnana’ula.  Hawaiians had diferent kaona (hidden meanings) for the same word. One meaning of Pūnana’ula is ‘sacred nest’–perfectly  encapsulating its function–to protect and sustain the people who dwelled there.  Pūnana’ula also refers to the sweet potato that blanketed much of the ‘aina.

he generational mo’olelo, the chants, and the petroglyphs indicate that Pūnana’ula was a thriving village of Hawaiian families who lived on the Wai’anae Kai side of Ka’ala during the winter and the Wai’anae Uka (or Wahiawa side of the mountain) during the summer.  Uncle Glen recalls his Tūtūwāhine’s mo’olelo, “As a child, my Tūtūkane carried us on his back every winter over the mountain to escape the cold of Wai’anae Uka and to ish. he cold side would make the babies sickly, so they raised us on this side.” Pūnana’ula was a Pu’uhonua (refuge) against cold and wet winters, even for the ali’i.

Today the ‘aina remains a temple for Kupuka’aina ‘ohana, but the land needs revitalization. Ho’omau Ke Ola are stewards of a piece of the 1,100 acres. hey plan to use the land for it’s original purpose–to sustain and heal. hey invite the public to come.  Like Uncle Glen said, “his ‘aina is a temple for many ‘ohana.  We want to see it beneit all of our Wai’anae families.”

Today the ‘aina remains a temple for Kupuka’aina ‘ohana, but the land needs revitalization. Ho’omau Ke Ola are stewards of a piece of the 1,100 acres. hey plan to use the land for it’s original purpose–to sustain and heal. hey invite the public to come.  Like Uncle Glen said, “his ‘aina is a temple for many ‘ohana.  We want to see it beneit all of our Wai’anae families.”

HO’OMAU KE OLAToday the ‘aina remains a temple for Kupuka’aina ‘ohana, but the land needs revitalization. Ho’omau Ke Ola are stewards of a piece of the 2,000 acres. hey plan to use the land for it’s original purpose–to sustain and heal. hey invite the public to come.  Like Uncle Glen said, “his ‘aina is a temple for many ‘ohana.  We want to see it beneit all of our Wai’anae ‘ohana.”

Ho’omau Ke Ola’s Dr. Patti Isaacs says, “I was called to this ‘aina to steward it.  It tells me what it needs, and what it needs is people to care for it and each other.” he mission of Ho’omau Ke Ola is to perpetuate life as it should be for people who struggle with drug addiction. he treatment center has spent decades helping the lost and downtrodden ind their way.  heir program blends Western and Hawaiian cultural practices to ground haumāna in things greater than themselves.  Pu’uhonua of Pūnana’ula is the perfect place to heal.  he Haumāna work the ‘aina learning the ka’anani’au, or the rolling beauty of time–that there is a season, and a time for every- thing under heaven.

Ho’omau Ke Ola invites you to spend time, work the land, and share aloha with the haumāna.  Dr. Patti shared that some of the haumāna have never heard positive airmations. For some, it is  positivity the new normal.”  Ho’omau Ke Ola will be hosting a bless- ing this month to prepare the ‘aina for all that is in store.  For more information, please contact them at 808-696-4266. Visit them  on the web at www.hoomaukeola.org, or drive up to Ka’ala.  Take the left fork. Drive a half mile. You’ll ind them on the left.

In subsequent issues we’ll share more about their progress and Uncle Glen Kila’s mana’o about the ‘aina. Please refer back next month.